# Thursday, 30 April 2015

One of the most exciting things I took away from Microsoft's Build 2015 event on day 1 apart from the fact they were embracing all platforms this time was how they proved that by releasing their first code editor that works for all environments Mac OS X, Linux and Windows. Visual Studio Code was a bit of wow moment for me it kind of said “They really mean it”

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Visual Studio Code seems to have quite a light footprint. The install was pretty quick and as soon as the app launched I realised it looked strikingly familiar to Microsoft's online code editor I have been using for an Azure website called Monaco (below)

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Visual Studio Code (below)

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I would imagine that this is intentional so users have an online and offline version of the editor. To get started with development Microsoft have some tutorials setup specifically for Visual Studio Code. You can get started with a ASP.NET 5 app in Visual Studio Code using the tutorial found here. As Visual Studio Code is so light weight all scaffolding for your projects is done from the command line.

To get started with the tutorial you will need to install:

If you haven’t installed VS 2015 before you will need to install DNVM (.NET Version Manager) which you will later use to install dnx (this is covered in the tutorial)

NodeJS will also need to be installed which will install npm (the package manager for Node.JS) if you haven’t used npm before this, its not that clear from the tutorial.

After you have followed the tutorial you should have a scaffolded project you can view in Visual Studio Code. If you don’t want to go through the above tutorial you can always create the project in VS 2015 and then view it in Visual Studio Code.

What I like about this and saw quite a lot of this mentioned is how Microsoft is embracing other initiatives instead of reinventing the wheel and making everything the “Microsoft way” as they have previously done in the past.

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Editing code in Visual Studio Code is a breeze and I quite like how light weight it is and if you have been using Monaco it shouldn’t seem too different to you especially the integrated Git access. You can also launch kestrel (the web server) from the command line. However while I was able to get most things working with Visual Studio Code I was unable to get Debugging working for my MVC application. The documentation does state that debugging is not yet supported in Mac OS X and Linux although I was using a Windows machine at the time.



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Thursday, 30 April 2015 12:04:03 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]